The Old Cowboy’s Trip to Austin Part Three

I was a little upset when we arrived in the State Capital. I write westerns and the cowboys I write about don’t keep a rain storm or even a blizzard keeps them from rounding up their cows. It sprinkled a couple of drops of rain and the award ceremony on the Capital steps was canceled. However the rib dinner and the picture taking was still going to happen that night….

The Old Cowboy’s Trip to Austin Part Two

  Anyway we got all loaded up and on the road. Here I am riding in the back seat, which I have never been able to do since I was a teenager, without getting car sick. And to top it all off, I’m putting my life in the hands of a woman driver. That’s something a real man would never do in the old days, but as I’ve gotten older,…

The Old Cowboy’s Trip to Austin

I was going to Austin Tx to accept the award for the Best Western Series and I was really dreading driving all that distance. (almost 200 miles) Since I’ve gotten older I really don’t like to drive. Well, a young lady and her friend invited me to ride with them. Here I’m gonna tell some things that I don’t like. I do not like waiting on people. I’m sorry, it’s…

Traditions From Spain

The ranchers brought with them other Spanish traditions. They organized their landholdings as haciendas. A hacienda engaged in any money-making business: lumber, sheep, mining, farming, etc. However, the further north from central Mexico the haciendas spread, the more they became limited to cattle raising and the larger they grew in order to support the herds. Over time, the hacienda became an enclosed community, a feudal estate, whose workers and their…

Land Grants

The first land grants were laid out in porciónes, long thin strips of land beginning at the river and stretching inland (on both sides of the Rio Grande). This odd configuration assured water for each landowner. Ranchers moving into the arid brush country beyond the porciónes needed and received very large land grants to support their cattle. They built ranch headquarters where there was a steady supply of water, usually…

J.R. Evers Signs with Outlaws Publishing

Outlaws Publishing is proud to announce we have just signed an exclusive contract with author J.R. Evers, a fellow Texan. J.R., like so many new authors has been struggling to self-publish his stories and discovered Outlaws Publishing, a company who is dedicated to helping new authors with that struggle. J.R. writes westerns, our favorite genre of stories. We will be releasing his first book in the near future. We believe,…

The First Settlers

The first settlers came from ranching communities in Queretaro, Nuevo Leon, and Coahuila, where they had already learned how to live and raise cattle successfully in those arid regions. These small settlements, or villas, along the Rio Grande, together with the vast ranches supplying the missions near San Antonio and Goliad, were the birthplace of the American cattle industry. Some of these Rio Grande ranches grew into settlements, becoming towns…

The Humble Beginnings of the Legendary Cattle Ranches

One of the most recognizable elements of the old west was the plight of the rancher. Although wild cattle had drifted northward from ranchos in central Mexico since the 1500s, cattle ranching in South Texas began in 1749, when José de Escandón, the governor of Nuevo Leon, brought 3,000 settlers and 146 soldiers to settle the area bordering the Rio Bravo. This area, the northernmost stretch of the province of…

The Comfortable Road of The West

  Writing westerns is a little like taking a trip that you’ve taken many times before—only instead of being nervous about getting lost, driving off a cliff or getting into a car accident—you don’t have to take chances. You might find yourself experimenting with your stories. Westerns are character driven, they’re action driven and they’re a genre that thrives on tradition. You’re not writing history—you’re writing someone’s version of history….